3 publications found
pregnancy (8)predictors (4) chronic pain (3)treatment (2)

Persistency and/or duration of pain symptoms and widespread pain are predictors of chronic pain

‘This study is unique as it is one of few long-term follow-up studies following women with PPGP of more than 11 years. The results show that spontaneous recovery with no recurrences is an unlikely scenario for a subgroup of women with PPGP. Persistency and/or duration of pain symptoms as well as widespread pain appear to be the strongest predictors of poor long-term outcome. Moreover, widespread pain is commonly associated with PPGP and may thus contribute to long-term sick leave and disability pension. A screening tool needs to be developed for the identification of women at risk of developing PPGP to enable early intervention.’

full text Bergström et al, 2017

 

PLBP/PGP needs to be addressed early in pregnancy to reduce both individual suffering and risk of chronicity

‘Most women did not report any sick leave or sought any healthcare due to PLBP/PGP the past 6 months at Q3. However, women with ‘continuous’ PLBP/PGP 14 months postpartum did report a higher prevalence and degree of sick leave and sought healthcare to a higher extent compared to women with ‘recurrent’ PLBP/PGP at Q3. Women with more pronounced symptoms might constitute a specific subgroup of patients with a less favourable long-term outcome, thus PLBP/PGP needs to be addressed early in pregnancy to reduce both individual suffering and the risk of transition into chronicity.’

full text Bergström et al, 2016

Assessment of pain in the lumbopelvic area early in pregnancy and postpartum necessary to identify women with risk of long term pain

‘This unique long-term follow up of PGP highlights the importance of assessment of pain in the lumbopelvic area early in pregnancy and postpartum in order to identify women with risk of long term pain. One of 10 women with PGP in pregnancy has severe consequences up to 11 years later. They could be identified by number of positive pain provocation tests and experience of previous LBP. Access to evidence based treatments are important for individual and socioeconomic reasons.’

full text Elden et al, 2016